A Tale of Harassment

Harassment is one issue which most of us ladies have experienced one way or another..
This blog is about harassment episode which I faced three years ago

Find link below for further reading:

Our Company said if he didn’t touch you, it isn’t harassment

http://blogs.tribune.com.pk/story/42465/our-company-said-if-he-didnt-touch-you-it-isnt-harassment/

15036585_10157703107885035_6685227320351913996_n

Photo: Express Tribune Blogs (Online)

Book Review: Diary of Social Butterfly

“And he said, ‘Go on, then, name one book you know well.’ And cool as a cucumber, I said, ‘Cheque book!”

 You probably would be laughing your head off after reading above-mentioned line, and must be wondering which novel is this!

moni mohsin 2So, the line is an extract from Moni Mohsin’s novel ‘The Diary of Social Butterfly’. The story revolves around Butterfly who is a socialite and main protagonist. She lives in  Lahore with her husband Janoo and her only son Kulchoo. No kidding these are the names of the characters.

The main attraction of this novel is Butterfly who is a typical wannabe socialite with her horrible English language. I remember I was reading in my office and I had to close down the book because I could not stop my frequent burst of laughter at her incorrect English.

According to Butterfly, she is the most well-educated, well-mannered and most generous person on earth. No one is like her.She lives in her own sweet world, surrounded by her like-minded friends. She just loves parties, fashion and gossips.

The novel covers the turmoil in Pakistan including militarization, 9/11, emergency, terrorist attacks, Benazir assassination and fundamental policies. However, Butterfly has no concern whatsoever.  Her interest in politics or literature is next to nothing.

Butterfly’s use of the English language is really interesting and throws up quite a few innuendos. The most hilarious one I found consists of Butterfly describing her mother-in-law’s (The Old bag’s) angina attack as vagina attack. Then to her husband’s (Janoo) metaphorically, she understands as stratospheric.

The novel is incredibly witty and hilarious but on the flip side, there is no plot or story and at times, the misspelling and bad grammar, really breaks the pace of the reading for the reader.

Caution: If you are a literature aficionado  so this is not for you.

I will rate this book 3 out of 5

Happy Reading everyone!

Time to Speak Out and Break the Taboo

 

menstruation-638x280

Need of the Time

Menstruation, also known as Periods is a regular natural cycle that occurs in the female reproductive system but girls particularly in Pakistan dread getting their periods. Unfortunately in Pakistan, menstruation is a hushed matter due to cultural constraints. Therefore, many girls face a lot of obstacles when it comes to sanitation.

According to UNICEF report, only 20 percent of girls have access to sanitary napkins in school whereas most of the girls reported that they can’t go to schools if they can’t find pads to wear or a toilet in which to change them in the school premises.  Girls also reported a lack of adequate facilities in school bathrooms while some schools don’t have running water so that girls can keep their hands and bodies clean while menstruating. There is a dire need to break the silence on this topic, so that millions of young girls every year don’t see their period as a disability, but a natural, normal part of their lives.

In a bid to break the stereotype associated with menstruation, the Menstrual Hygiene Management (MHM) campaign was launched by the MHM working group to increase awareness about sanitation and menstruation hygiene environment.

The day is observed on May 28 every year across the world aims at creating awareness to break taboos and myths around menstruation and to encourage women to overcome their hesitation about menses.

Every year, the theme is different and this year, the global theme of the day is “Menstruation Matters for Everyone, Everywhere.”

m

Time to Speak Out

In Pakistan, a panel discussion was held which focused on how the health, education, and sanitation of adolescent girls are impacted by lack of proper MHM was organized. Panelists included government representatives from across the country that explored the much-needed solutions to tackle the taboo and associated problems that females’ especially young adolescent girls face.  The event was organized by the MHM Working Group, a coalition of humanitarian organizations working to champion menstrual hygiene rights in Pakistan.

Menstrual Hygiene Management remains a taboo in Pakistan which affects a woman’s self-esteem, health and education.

Young girls in Pakistan bare most of this brunt as they lack the knowledge and services to manage menstruation which in turn affects their learning experiences. Research reveals that marginalized girls can miss up to two to four consecutive days of schools every four weeks due to their periods. This of course has serious implications on their learning.

Women are the bringer of new life into the world, and periods are a part of that process. This is an attitude that we need to bring back into our conversations, but also our attitudes, towards all matters related to sexual and reproductive health. It is time that all sectors come together to break the silence around MHM by supporting strong policy implementation across all state levels.

 

 

#UnfairandLovely: Breaking Dark Colour Stereotype!

Beauty lies in the eyes of beholder not in the skin tone.

Dark skin is not a taboo and we need to break this stereotype

Click the link below to read my write up on the recent campaign #unfairandlovely..
http://blogs.tribune.com.pk/story/33624/unfairandlovely-being-attractive-should-not-be-synonymous-with-being-fair-skinned/

Marriage of Convenience

In the month of October (2010), a strange event took place which attracted the media. It became the topic of discussion for different talk shows and many were either in favor of this or showed their disagreement.

It was really a ‘marriage of convenience’ and this phrase really set well when in the mid of October a rare wedding was held.

A father in Multan sought a relative reconciliation with a unique union of three people: one young man and his two wives. The father of the groom persuaded with pride as his son went on to marry two of his cousins in the space of couple of days. The first wedding took place in full media glare and the scene was again re-shot with a minor change in detail, that being the addition of a fresh bride to replace the other bride. The father of the groom has a widowed sister and widowed sister-in-law and they both had daughters. They both were according to the Pakistani parlance ‘marriageable’ age. The boy’s father didn’t want to hurt his sister as well as his sister-in-law and therefore he came up with the idea of obliging both. After wedding the groom asked for the sponsored honeymoon from the government.

I do not understand what in the world, we live in. I mean marriage is not just to oblige anyone it is a way of connecting two individuals with the consent of Almighty Allah but we have taken this in lighter mode. It is considered to be a blissful moment in one’s life but double marriage and that also to favor someone turns a cheerful mode into a compromising mode. It is all because of less understanding of religion and trying to mould the religion according to our own convenience.